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Ruptured dermoid cyst of the lateral cavernous sinus wall with temporary symptoms: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, August 2016
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Title
Ruptured dermoid cyst of the lateral cavernous sinus wall with temporary symptoms: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13256-016-1007-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yasushi Kosuge, Hidetaka Onodera, Taigen Sase, Masashi Uchida, Hiroshi Takasuna, Hidemichi Ito, Kotaro Oshio, Yuichiro Tanaka

Abstract

Dermoid cysts are non-neoplastic tumors that arise from defects in the separation of the neuroectoderm. Cyst rupture rarely occurs spontaneously and the most common symptom is headache, followed by seizure. Although many cases of ruptured dermoid cysts present with symptoms, reports of cases that are asymptomatic, or where symptoms disappear, are rare. We report the case of a 66-year-old Asian man with a history of sudden onset headache who was found to have high amounts of fat material in the subarachnoid space and a fat suppression mass in the left cavernous sinus. He underwent oral steroid therapy. Five days after starting medication his headache symptoms disappeared. Routine neurological imaging was then performed without surgical procedure. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed evidence of the remains of a static lesion 6 months after his first visit. He has remained headache free for 10 months since the initial event. Although cases of ruptured dermoid cysts presenting with consistent symptoms have been commonly reported, until now there were few reports on asymptomatic cases or cases where symptoms disappeared. We believe that surgical intervention is unnecessary for ruptured dermoid cysts with minimal symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 1 50%
Student > Postgraduate 1 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2016.
All research outputs
#9,071,166
of 11,329,665 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#934
of 1,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,262
of 261,020 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#34
of 84 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,684 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.