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Group decisions and individual differences: route fidelity predicts flight leadership in homing pigeons ( Columba livia )

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, September 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Group decisions and individual differences: route fidelity predicts flight leadership in homing pigeons ( Columba livia )
Published in
Biology Letters, September 2010
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2010.0627
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robin Freeman, Richard Mann, Tim Guilford, Dora Biro

Abstract

How social-living animals make collective decisions is currently the subject of intense scientific interest, with increasing focus on the role of individual variation within the group. Previously, we demonstrated that during paired flight in homing pigeons, a fully transitive leadership hierarchy emerges as birds are forced to choose between their own and their partner's habitual routes. This stable hierarchy suggests a role for individual differences mediating leadership decisions within homing pigeon pairs. What these differences are, however, has remained elusive. Using novel quantitative techniques to analyse habitual route structure, we show here that leadership can be predicted from prior route-following fidelity. Birds that are more faithful to their own route when homing alone are more likely to emerge as leaders when homing socially. We discuss how this fidelity may relate to the leadership phenomenon, and propose that leadership may emerge from the interplay between individual route confidence and the dynamics of paired flight.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 7 6%
Germany 2 2%
Italy 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 109 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 32 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 21%
Student > Master 16 13%
Student > Bachelor 15 12%
Unspecified 10 8%
Other 26 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 79 63%
Unspecified 10 8%
Environmental Science 6 5%
Computer Science 5 4%
Mathematics 4 3%
Other 21 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2014.
All research outputs
#485,058
of 12,364,029 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#670
of 2,303 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#472,840
of 11,765,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#659
of 2,239 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,364,029 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,303 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,765,069 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,239 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.