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Early childhood development in Rwanda: a policy analysis of the human rights legal framework

Overview of attention for article published in BMC International Health and Human Rights, January 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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75 Mendeley
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Title
Early childhood development in Rwanda: a policy analysis of the human rights legal framework
Published in
BMC International Health and Human Rights, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12914-016-0076-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Agnes Binagwaho, Kirstin W. Scott, Sardis H. Harward

Abstract

Early childhood development (ECD) is a critical period that continues to impact human health and productivity throughout the lifetime. Failing to provide policies and programs that support optimal developmental attainment when such services are financially and logistically feasible can result in negative population health, education and economic consequences that might otherwise be avoided. Rwanda, with its commitment to rights-based policy and program planning, serves as a case study for examination of the national, regional, and global human rights legal frameworks that inform ECD service delivery. In this essay, we summarize key causes and consequences of the loss of early developmental potential and how this relates to the human rights legal framework in Rwanda. We contend that sub-optimal early developmental attainment constitutes a violation of individuals' rights to health, education, and economic prosperity. These rights are widely recognized in global, regional and national human rights instruments, and are guaranteed by Rwanda's constitution. Recent policy implementation by several Rwandan ministries has increased access to health and social services that promote achievement of full developmental potential. These ECD-centric activities are characterized by an integrated approach to strengthening the services provided by several public sectors. Combining population level activities with those at the local level, led by local community health workers and women's councils, can bolster community education and ensure uptake of ECD services. Realization of the human rights to health, education, and economic prosperity requires and benefits from attention to the period of ECD, as early childhood has the potential to be an opportunity for expedient intervention or the first case of human rights neglect in a lifetime of rights violations. Efforts to improve ECD services and outcomes at the population level require multisector collaboration at the highest echelons of government, as well as local education and participation at the community level.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Researcher 8 11%
Other 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 14 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 18 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 16 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2016.
All research outputs
#3,002,740
of 13,204,401 outputs
Outputs from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#140
of 352 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,290
of 262,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,204,401 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 352 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,684 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them