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Environmental, maternal, and reproductive risk factors for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Egypt: a case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, August 2016
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Title
Environmental, maternal, and reproductive risk factors for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Egypt: a case-control study
Published in
BMC Cancer, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2689-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sameera Ezzat, Wafaa M. Rashed, Sherin Salem, M. Tevfik Dorak, Mai El-Daly, Mohamed Abdel-Hamid, Iman Sidhom, Alaa El-Hadad, Christopher Loffredo

Abstract

Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric cancer. The exact cause is not known in most cases, but past epidemiological research has suggested a number of potential risk factors. This study evaluated associations between environmental and parental factors and the risk for ALL in Egyptian children to gain insight into risk factors in this developing country. We conducted a case-control design from May 2009 to February 2012. Cases were recruited from Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt (CCHE). Healthy controls were randomly selected from the general population to frequency-match the cumulative group of cases by sex, age groups (<1; 1 - 5; >5 - 10; >10 years) and region of residence (Cairo metropolitan region, Nile Delta region (North), and Upper Egypt (South)). Mothers provided answers to an administered questionnaire about their environmental exposures and health history including those of the father. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression with adjustment for covariates. Two hundred ninety nine ALL cases and 351 population-based controls frequency-matched for age group, gender and location were recruited. The risk of ALL was increased with the mother's use of medications for ovulation induction (ORadj = 2.5, 95 % CI =1.2 -5.1) and to a lesser extend with her age (ORadj = 1.8, 95 % CI = 1.1 - 2.8, for mothers ≥ 30 years old). Delivering the child by Cesarean section, was also associated with increased risk (ORadj = 2.01, 95 % CI =1.24-2.81). In Egypt, the risk for childhood ALL appears to be associated with older maternal age, and certain maternal reproductive factors.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 24%
Student > Bachelor 9 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Other 10 22%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Psychology 3 7%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,144,843
of 8,261,086 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,810
of 3,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,132
of 253,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#164
of 236 outputs
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