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The role of microglia in brain maintenance: implications for Rett syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Immunology, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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67 Dimensions

Readers on

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162 Mendeley
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Title
The role of microglia in brain maintenance: implications for Rett syndrome
Published in
Trends in Immunology, March 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.it.2012.10.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Noël C. Derecki, James C. Cronk, Jonathan Kipnis

Abstract

The role of microglia in central nervous system (CNS) pathology has been studied extensively, and more recently, examination of microglia in the healthy brain has yielded important insights into their many functions. It was long assumed that microglia were essentially quiescent cells, unless provoked into activation, which was considered a hallmark of disease. More recently, however, it has become increasingly clear that they are extraordinarily dynamic cells, constantly sampling their environment and adjusting to exquisitely delicate stimuli. Along these lines, our laboratory has identified a new and unexpected role for microglial phagocytosis - or lack thereof - in the pathophysiology of Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disease caused by mutation of the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein (MECP)2. We have shown that specific expression of wild type Mecp2 in myeloid cells of Mecp2-null mice is sufficient to arrest major symptoms associated with this devastating disease. This beneficial effect, however, is abolished if phagocytic activity of microglia is inhibited. Here, we discuss microglial origins, the role of microglia in brain development and maintenance, and the phenomenon of microglial augmentation by myeloid progenitor cells in the adult brain. Finally, we address in some detail the beneficial roles of microglia as clinical targets in Rett syndrome and other neurological disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 147 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 27%
Researcher 31 19%
Student > Master 27 17%
Student > Bachelor 14 9%
Student > Postgraduate 9 6%
Other 28 17%
Unknown 10 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 81 50%
Neuroscience 27 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 1%
Other 10 6%
Unknown 14 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2017.
All research outputs
#3,763,041
of 8,900,478 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Immunology
#457
of 727 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,949
of 294,723 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Immunology
#6
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,900,478 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 727 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,723 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.