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PATHOGENICITY OF AVIAN MALARIA IN EXPERIMENTALLY-INFECTED HAWAII AMAKIHI

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, April 2000
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

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246 Dimensions

Readers on

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288 Mendeley
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Title
PATHOGENICITY OF AVIAN MALARIA IN EXPERIMENTALLY-INFECTED HAWAII AMAKIHI
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, April 2000
DOI 10.7589/0090-3558-36.2.197
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carter T. Atkinson, Robert J. Dusek, Karen L. Woods, William M. Iko

Abstract

The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) and mosquitoes (Culex quinquefasciatus) to the Hawaiian Islands (USA) is believed to have played a major role in the decline and extinction of native Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae). This introduced disease is thought to be one of the primary factors limiting recovery of honeycreepers at elevations below 1,200 m where native forest habitats are still relatively intact. One of the few remaining species of honeycreepers with a wide elevational distribution is the Hawaii Amakihi (Hernignathus virens). We measured morbidity and mortality in experimentally-infected Hawaii Amakihi that were captured in a high elevation, xeric habitat that is above the current range of the mosquito vector. Mortality among amakihi exposed to a single infective mosquito bite was 65% (13/20). All infected birds had significant declines in food consumption and a corresponding loss in body weight over the 60 day course of the experiment. Gross and microscopic lesions in birds that succumbed to malaria included enlargement and discoloration of the spleen and liver and parasitemias as high as 50% of circulating erythrocytes. Mortality in experimentally-infected amakihi was similar to that observed in Apapane (Himnatione sanguinea) and lower than that observed in Iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea) infected under similar conditions with the same parasite isolate. We conclude that the current elevational and geographic distribution of Hawaiian honeycreepers is determined by relative susceptibility to avian malaria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 288 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 3%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Lithuania 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 262 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 55 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 19%
Student > Master 49 17%
Researcher 40 14%
Other 15 5%
Other 51 18%
Unknown 24 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 152 53%
Environmental Science 37 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 15 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 4%
Other 18 6%
Unknown 32 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2016.
All research outputs
#8,852,631
of 16,056,369 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#237
of 414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,906
of 259,002 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,056,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 414 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,002 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.