↓ Skip to main content

Pairing images of unhealthy and healthy foods with images of negative and positive health consequences: Impact on attitudes and food choice.

Overview of attention for article published in Health Psychology, August 2016
Altmetric Badge

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Pairing images of unhealthy and healthy foods with images of negative and positive health consequences: Impact on attitudes and food choice.
Published in
Health Psychology, August 2016
DOI 10.1037/hea0000293
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gareth J. Hollands, Theresa M. Marteau

Abstract

To examine the impact of presenting images of foods paired with images of positive and negative health consequences of their consumption on food choice and attitudes. Participants (N = 711) were randomly allocated in a 2 × 3 factorial design (Food Type × Affective Valence) to 1 of 6 conditioning procedures that paired images of either energy-dense snack foods or fruit, with (a) images of negative health outcomes, (b) images of positive health outcomes, or (c) a no image control. The primary outcome was food choice assessed postintervention with a behavioral choice task. Secondary outcomes were implicit attitudes (assessed pre- and postintervention) and explicit attitudes (assessed postintervention). Presenting images of negative health outcomes led to more healthy food choices relative to control and positive image conditions, irrespective of whether they were paired with images of energy-dense snack foods or fruit. This relationship was partially mediated by changes in implicit and explicit attitudes. Images of positive health outcomes did not alter food choices. This study replicates and extends previous research showing that presenting images of negative health consequences increases healthy food choices. Because effects were elicited by manipulating affective valence irrespective of paired food type, these results appear more consistent with an explanation based on priming than on evaluative conditioning. (PsycINFO Database Record

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 28%
Researcher 12 21%
Student > Bachelor 10 18%
Student > Master 7 12%
Unspecified 6 11%
Other 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 28 49%
Unspecified 9 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Other 6 11%