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Microspectrophotometric evidence for cone monochromacy in sharks

Overview of attention for article published in Naturwissenschaften, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Microspectrophotometric evidence for cone monochromacy in sharks
Published in
Naturwissenschaften, January 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00114-010-0758-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathan Scott Hart, Susan Michelle Theiss, Blake Kristin Harahush, Shaun Patrick Collin

Abstract

Sharks are apex predators, and their evolutionary success is in part due to an impressive array of sensory systems, including vision. The eyes of sharks are well developed and function over a wide range of light levels. However, whilst close relatives of the sharks-the rays and chimaeras-are known to have the potential for colour vision, an evolutionary trait thought to provide distinct survival advantages, evidence for colour vision in sharks remains equivocal. Using single-receptor microspectrophotometry, we measured the absorbance spectra of visual pigments located in the retinal photoreceptors of 17 species of shark. We show that, while the spectral tuning of the rod (wavelength of maximum absorbance, λ(max) 484-518 nm) and cone (λ(max) 532-561 nm) visual pigments varies between species, each shark has only a single long-wavelength-sensitive cone type. This suggests that sharks may be cone monochromats and, therefore, potentially colour blind. Whilst cone monochromacy on land is rare, it may be a common strategy in the marine environment: many aquatic mammals (whales, dolphins and seals) also possess only a single, green-sensitive cone type. It appears that both sharks and marine mammals may have arrived at the same visual design by convergent evolution. The spectral tuning of the rod and cone pigments of sharks is also discussed in relation to their visual ecology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Spain 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Serbia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Unknown 68 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 19%
Researcher 15 19%
Student > Master 8 10%
Other 5 6%
Other 15 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 61%
Neuroscience 5 6%
Unspecified 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Environmental Science 3 4%
Other 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2018.
All research outputs
#358,587
of 12,373,288 outputs
Outputs from Naturwissenschaften
#82
of 1,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#349,963
of 11,780,420 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Naturwissenschaften
#82
of 1,259 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,288 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,408 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,780,420 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,259 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.