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Documento faz diferença: o caso das trabalhadoras domésticas brasileiras em Massachusetts, Estados Unidos

Overview of attention for article published in Cadernos de Saúde Pública, January 2016
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Title
Documento faz diferença: o caso das trabalhadoras domésticas brasileiras em Massachusetts, Estados Unidos
Published in
Cadernos de Saúde Pública, January 2016
DOI 10.1590/0102-311x00131115
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. Eduardo Siqueira, Gabriella Barreto Soares, Pedro Luiz de Araújo Neto, Maria Natalicia Tracy

Abstract

Brazilian immigrants in the United States experience various social, labor, and health challenges. This study aimed to analyze the profile of female Brazilian domestic workers in Massachusetts, USA, through a description of their working conditions and self-rated health. This was a cross-sectional study of 198 domestic workers in Massachusetts, recruited with "snowball" sampling. The instrument addressed participants' demographic characteristics, work conditions, and self-rated health. Data were analyzed with SPSS 21.0. Among the interviewees, 95.5% were women, 62.1% were 30 to 49 years of age, and 55.6% were undocumented. Documented and undocumented participants showed statistically significant differences in demographics, work conditions, and health. Irregular immigrant status appears to have a negative impact on domestic workers' living and health conditions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Student > Bachelor 2 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Lecturer 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Other 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 6 55%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 18%
Psychology 2 18%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 9%