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Axonal plasticity underpins the functional recovery following surgical decompression in a rat model of cervical spondylotic myelopathy

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, August 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Axonal plasticity underpins the functional recovery following surgical decompression in a rat model of cervical spondylotic myelopathy
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40478-016-0359-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rana S. Dhillon, John Parker, Yasir A. Syed, Steve Edgley, Adam Young, James W. Fawcett, Nick D. Jeffery, Robin J. M. Franklin, Mark R. N. Kotter

Abstract

Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common spinal cord disorder and a major cause of disability in adults. Improvements following surgical decompression are limited and patients often remain severely disabled. Post mortem studies indicate that CSM is associated with profound axonal loss. However, our understanding of the pathophysiology of CSM remains limited.To investigate the hypothesis that axonal plasticity plays a role in the recovery following surgical decompression, we adopted a novel preclinical model of mild to moderate CSM. Spinal cord compression resulted in significant locomotor deterioration, increased expression of the axonal injury marker APP, and loss of serotonergic fibres. Surgical decompression partially reversed the deficits and attenuated APP expression. Decompression was also associated with axonal sprouting, reflected in the restoration of serotonergic fibres and an increase of GAP43 expression. The re-expression of synaptophysin indicated the restoration of functional synapses following decompression. Promoting axonal plasticity may therefore be a therapeutic strategy for promoting neurological recovery in CSM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Professor 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Lecturer 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 4 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Engineering 2 8%
Physics and Astronomy 2 8%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 9 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2016.
All research outputs
#3,546,197
of 8,276,988 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#213
of 386 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,031
of 253,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#20
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,276,988 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 386 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,534 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.