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No effect of host-parasite co-evolution on host range expansion

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Evolutionary Biology, November 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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63 Mendeley
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Title
No effect of host-parasite co-evolution on host range expansion
Published in
Journal of Evolutionary Biology, November 2012
DOI 10.1111/jeb.12021
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. D. Scanlan, A. R. Hall, P. Burlinson, G. Preston, A. Buckling

Abstract

Antagonistic co-evolution between hosts and parasites (reciprocal selection for resistance and infectivity) is hypothesized to play an important role in host range expansion by selecting for novel infectivity alleles, but tests are lacking. Here, we determine whether experimental co-evolution between a bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25) and a phage (SBW25Φ2) affects interstrain host range: the ability to infect different strains of P. fluorescens other than SBW25. We identified and tested a genetically and phenotypically diverse suite of co-evolved phage variants of SBW25Φ2 against both sympatric and allopatric co-evolving hosts (P. fluorescens SBW25) and a large set of other P. fluorescens strains. Although all co-evolved phage had a greater host range than the ancestral phage and could differentially infect co-evolved variants of P. fluorescens SBW25, none could infect any of the alternative P. fluorescens strains. Thus, parasite generalism at one genetic scale does not appear to affect generalism at other scales, suggesting fundamental genetic constraints on parasite adaptation for this virus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
United States 2 3%
France 1 2%
Finland 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
Poland 1 2%
Unknown 53 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 30%
Researcher 14 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Master 6 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 6%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 73%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 6%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Unknown 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2012.
All research outputs
#1,304,896
of 12,229,332 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Evolutionary Biology
#291
of 1,925 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,370
of 278,702 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Evolutionary Biology
#27
of 185 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,229,332 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,925 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,702 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 185 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.