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Climate change and the eco‐hydrology of fire: Will area burned increase in a warming western USA?

Overview of attention for article published in Ecological Applications, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 2,990)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
21 news outlets
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
89 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
183 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Climate change and the eco‐hydrology of fire: Will area burned increase in a warming western USA?
Published in
Ecological Applications, December 2016
DOI 10.1002/eap.1420
Pubmed ID
Authors

Donald McKenzie, Jeremy S. Littell

Abstract

Wildfire area is predicted to increase with global warming. Empirical statistical models and process-based simulations agree almost universally. The key relationship for this unanimity, observed at multiple spatial and temporal scales, is between drought and fire. Predictive models often focus on ecosystems in which this relationship appears to be particularly strong, such as mesic and arid forests and shrublands with substantial biomass such as chaparral. We examine the drought-fire relationship, specifically the correlations between water-balance deficit and annual area burned, across the full gradient of deficit in the western USA, from temperate rainforest to desert. In the middle of this gradient, conditional on vegetation (fuels), correlations are strong, but outside this range the equivalence hotter and drier equals more fire either breaks down or is contingent on other factors such as previous-year climate. This suggests that the regional drought-fire dynamic will not be stationary in future climate, nor will other more complex contingencies associated with the variation in fire extent. Predictions of future wildfire area therefore need to consider not only vegetation changes, as some dynamic vegetation models now do, but also potential changes in the drought-fire dynamic that will ensue in a warming climate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 183 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Unknown 180 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 49 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 19%
Student > Master 28 15%
Other 10 5%
Student > Bachelor 10 5%
Other 29 16%
Unknown 22 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 63 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 21 11%
Engineering 8 4%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Other 14 8%
Unknown 42 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 170. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2021.
All research outputs
#155,615
of 19,838,842 outputs
Outputs from Ecological Applications
#26
of 2,990 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,870
of 282,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecological Applications
#1
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,838,842 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,990 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,966 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.