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Contextual flexibility in the vocal repertoire of an Amazon parrot

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Contextual flexibility in the vocal repertoire of an Amazon parrot
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12983-016-0169-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adolfo Christian Montes-Medina, Alejandro Salinas-Melgoza, Katherine Renton

Abstract

Understanding the role of avian vocal communication in social organisation requires knowledge of the vocal repertoire used to convey information. Parrots use acoustic signals in a variety of social contexts, but no studies have evaluated cross-functional use of acoustic signals by parrots, or whether these conform to signal design rules for different behavioural contexts. We statistically characterised the vocal repertoire of 61 free-living Lilac-crowned Amazons (Amazona finschi) in nine behavioural contexts (nesting, threat, alarm, foraging, perched, take-off, flight, landing, and food soliciting). We aimed to determine whether parrots demonstrated contextual flexibility in their vocal repertoire, and whether these acoustic signals follow design rules that could maximise communication. The Lilac-crowned Amazon had a diverse vocal repertoire of 101 note-types emitted at least twice, 58 of which were emitted ≥5 times. Threat and nesting contexts had the greatest variety and proportion of exclusive note-types, although the most common note-types were emitted in all behavioural contexts but with differing proportional contribution. Behavioural context significantly explained variation in acoustic features, where threat and nesting contexts had the highest mean frequencies and broad bandwidths, and alarm signals had a high emission rate of 3.6 notes/s. Three Principal Components explained 72.03 % of the variation in temporal and spectral characteristics of notes. Permutated Discriminant Function Analysis using these Principal Components demonstrated that 28 note-types (emitted by >1 individual) could be correctly classified and significantly discriminated from a random model. Acoustic features of Lilac-crowned Amazon vocalisations in specific behavioural contexts conformed to signal design rules. Lilac-crowned Amazons modified the emission rate and proportional contribution of note-types used in each context, suggesting the use of graded and combinatorial variation to encode information. We propose that evaluation of vocal repertoires based on note-types would reflect the true extent of a species' vocal flexibility, and the potential for combinatorial structures in parrot acoustic signals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Argentina 1 2%
Unknown 62 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 19%
Student > Master 12 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Professor 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 50%
Environmental Science 5 8%
Neuroscience 4 6%
Engineering 3 5%
Philosophy 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 12 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2016.
All research outputs
#11,623,934
of 20,446,128 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#409
of 632 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,687
of 284,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,446,128 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 632 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.6. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,040 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.