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Contrasting Nitrogen Fate in Watersheds Using Agricultural and Water Quality Information

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2016
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Title
Contrasting Nitrogen Fate in Watersheds Using Agricultural and Water Quality Information
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2016
DOI 10.2134/jeq2016.02.0071
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hedeff I. Essaid, Nancy T. Baker, Kathleen A. McCarthy

Abstract

Surplus nitrogen (N) estimates, principal component analysis (PCA), and end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) were used in a multisite comparison contrasting the fate of N in diverse agricultural watersheds. We applied PCA-EMMA in 10 watersheds located in Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Nebraska, Mississippi, and Washington ranging in size from 5 to 1254 km with four nested watersheds. Watershed Surplus N was determined by subtracting estimates of crop uptake and volatilization from estimates of N input from atmospheric deposition, plant fixation, fertilizer, and manure for the period from 1987 to 2004. Watershed average Surplus N ranged from 11 to 52 kg N ha and from 9 to 32% of N input. Solute concentrations in streams, overland runoff, tile drainage, groundwater (GW), streambeds, and the unsaturated zone were used in the PCA-EMMA procedure to identify independent components contributing to observed stream concentration variability and the end-members contributing to streamflow and NO load. End-members included dilute runoff, agricultural runoff, benthic-processing, tile drainage, and oxic and anoxic GW. Surplus N was larger in watersheds with more permeable soils (Washington, Nebraska, and Maryland) that allowed greater infiltration, and oxic GW was the primary source of NO load. Subsurface transport of NO in these watersheds resulted in some removal of Surplus N by denitrification. In less permeable watersheds (Iowa, Indiana, and Mississippi), NO was rapidly transported to the stream by tile drainage and runoff with little removal. Evidence of streambed removal of NO by benthic diatoms was observed in the larger watersheds.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 20%
Unknown 8 80%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 20%
Researcher 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Professor 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Other 2 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 4 40%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 30%
Unspecified 2 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,421,775
of 10,691,358 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#1,098
of 1,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,827
of 259,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#18
of 32 outputs
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