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Suicide attempts and behavioral correlates among a nationally representative sample of school-attending adolescents in the Republic of Malawi

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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107 Mendeley
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Title
Suicide attempts and behavioral correlates among a nationally representative sample of school-attending adolescents in the Republic of Malawi
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3509-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Masood A. Shaikh, Jennifer Lloyd, Emmanuel Acquah, Karen L. Celedonia, Michael L. Wilson

Abstract

Suicide is among the top causes of adolescent mortality worldwide. While correlates of suicidal behavior are better understood and delineated in upper-income countries, epidemiologic knowledge of suicidal behavior in low-income countries remains scant, particularly in the African continent. The present study sought to add to the epidemiologic literature on suicidal behavior in Africa by examining the behavioral correlates of suicide attempts among Malawi adolescents. A cross-sectional study using a nationally-representative sample extracted from publically-available data was conducted. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to discern associations between suicide attempts and a host of behavioral variables. 2225 records were included in the study. At the multivariate level, suicide attempters had significantly higher odds of being anxious, being physically bullied, having sustained a serious injury and having a greater number of lifetime sexual partners. Alcohol use (at an early age and within the past 30 days) was also associated with suicide attempts. These findings have the potential to guide public health interventions geared toward suicide prevention in Africa and other, similar regions, as well as provide the impetus for future epidemiologic studies on suicidal behavior in low-income countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 106 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 20%
Student > Bachelor 15 14%
Researcher 14 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 27 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 23%
Psychology 20 19%
Social Sciences 15 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 14%
Sports and Recreations 2 2%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 28 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2017.
All research outputs
#5,865,027
of 11,553,067 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,093
of 7,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,053
of 258,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#195
of 384 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,553,067 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,934 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 384 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.