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Differential IgM expression distinguishes two types of pediatric Burkitt lymphoma in mouse and human.

Overview of attention for article published in Oncotarget, August 2016
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Title
Differential IgM expression distinguishes two types of pediatric Burkitt lymphoma in mouse and human.
Published in
Oncotarget, August 2016
DOI 10.18632/oncotarget.11531
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eason, Anthony B, Sin, Sang-Hoon, Lin, Carolina, Damania, Blossom, Park, Steven, Fedoriw, Yuri, Bacchi, Carlos E, Dittmer, Dirk P, Anthony B. Eason, Sang-Hoon Sin, Carolina Lin, Blossom Damania, Steven Park, Yuri Fedoriw, Carlos E. Bacchi, Dirk P. Dittmer

Abstract

Endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) is primarily a childhood cancer in parts of Africa and Brazil. Classic studies describe eBL as a homogeneous entity based on t(8;14) IgH-Myc translocation and clinical response to cytotoxic therapy. By contrast, sporadic BL (sBL) in Western countries is considered more heterogeneous, and affects both children and adults. It is overrepresented in AIDS patients. Unlike diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), molecular subtypes within BL have not been well defined. We find that differential IgM positivity can be used to describe two subtypes of pediatric Burkitt lymphoma both in a high incidence region (Brazil), as well as in a sporadic region (US), suggesting the phenotype is not necessarily geographically isolated. Moreover, we find that IgM positivity also distinguishes between early and late onset BL in the standard Eμ-Myc mouse model of BL. This suggests that the t(8;14) translocation not only can take place before, but also after isotype switch recombination, and that IgM-negative, t(8;14) positive lymphomas in children should nevertheless be considered BL.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 24%
Student > Master 4 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 12%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 35%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 18%
Unspecified 2 12%
Chemistry 2 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 12%
Other 2 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,168,861
of 8,290,197 outputs
Outputs from Oncotarget
#5,860
of 8,812 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#212,046
of 252,203 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oncotarget
#218
of 272 outputs
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