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LINEAGE DIVERSIFICATION AND MORPHOLOGICAL EVOLUTION IN A LARGE-SCALE CONTINENTAL RADIATION: THE NEOTROPICAL OVENBIRDS AND WOODCREEPERS (AVES: FURNARIIDAE)

Overview of attention for article published in Evolution, July 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
7 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
169 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
394 Mendeley
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Title
LINEAGE DIVERSIFICATION AND MORPHOLOGICAL EVOLUTION IN A LARGE-SCALE CONTINENTAL RADIATION: THE NEOTROPICAL OVENBIRDS AND WOODCREEPERS (AVES: FURNARIIDAE)
Published in
Evolution, July 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01374.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth P. Derryberry, Santiago Claramunt, Graham Derryberry, R. Terry Chesser, Joel Cracraft, Alexandre Aleixo, Jorge Pérez-Emán, J. V. Remsen Jr., Robb T. Brumfield

Abstract

Patterns of diversification in species-rich clades provide insight into the processes that generate biological diversity. We tested different models of lineage and phenotypic diversification in an exceptional continental radiation, the ovenbird family Furnariidae, using the most complete species-level phylogenetic hypothesis produced to date for a major avian clade (97% of 293 species). We found that the Furnariidae exhibit nearly constant rates of lineage accumulation but show evidence of constrained morphological evolution. This pattern of sustained high rates of speciation despite limitations on phenotypic evolution contrasts with the results of most previous studies of evolutionary radiations, which have found a pattern of decelerating diversity-dependent lineage accumulation coupled with decelerating or constrained phenotypic evolution. Our results suggest that lineage accumulation in tropical continental radiations may not be as limited by ecological opportunities as in temperate or island radiations. More studies examining patterns of both lineage and phenotypic diversification are needed to understand the often complex tempo and mode of evolutionary radiations on continents.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 394 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 23 6%
United States 14 4%
Germany 3 <1%
France 3 <1%
India 2 <1%
Peru 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Other 8 2%
Unknown 336 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 111 28%
Researcher 77 20%
Student > Master 55 14%
Student > Bachelor 40 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 28 7%
Other 69 18%
Unknown 14 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 327 83%
Environmental Science 16 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 2%
Psychology 1 <1%
Other 7 2%
Unknown 27 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2019.
All research outputs
#1,174,065
of 13,725,722 outputs
Outputs from Evolution
#523
of 3,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,131,873
of 13,036,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Evolution
#510
of 3,599 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,725,722 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,654 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 13,036,462 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,599 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.