↓ Skip to main content

Response of Colorado River runoff to dust radiative forcing in snow

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2010
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
42 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
226 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
246 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Response of Colorado River runoff to dust radiative forcing in snow
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2010
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0913139107
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. H. Painter, J. S. Deems, J. Belnap, A. F. Hamlet, C. C. Landry, B. Udall

Abstract

The waters of the Colorado River serve 27 million people in seven states and two countries but are overallocated by more than 10% of the river's historical mean. Climate models project runoff losses of 7-20% from the basin in this century due to human-induced climate change. Recent work has shown however that by the late 1800s, decades prior to allocation of the river's runoff in the 1920s, a fivefold increase in dust loading from anthropogenically disturbed soils in the southwest United States was already decreasing snow albedo and shortening the duration of snow cover by several weeks. The degree to which this increase in radiative forcing by dust in snow has affected timing and magnitude of runoff from the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is unknown. Here we use the Variable Infiltration Capacity model with postdisturbance and predisturbance impacts of dust on albedo to estimate the impact on runoff from the UCRB across 1916-2003. We find that peak runoff at Lees Ferry, Arizona has occurred on average 3 wk earlier under heavier dust loading and that increases in evapotranspiration from earlier exposure of vegetation and soils decreases annual runoff by more than 1.0 billion cubic meters or ∼5% of the annual average. The potential to reduce dust loading through surface stabilization in the deserts and restore more persistent snow cover, slow runoff, and increase water resources in the UCRB may represent an important mitigation opportunity to reduce system management tensions and regional impacts of climate change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 246 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 4%
New Zealand 2 <1%
Norway 2 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 227 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 73 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 23%
Student > Master 42 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 17 7%
Unspecified 16 7%
Other 42 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 94 38%
Environmental Science 65 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 13%
Unspecified 25 10%
Engineering 13 5%
Other 17 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 387. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2019.
All research outputs
#26,377
of 13,285,014 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#720
of 79,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,872
of 12,645,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#720
of 79,651 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,285,014 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,851 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 12,645,422 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79,651 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.