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Ecology of Zoonotic Infectious Diseases in Bats: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

Overview of attention for article published in Zoonoses & Public Health, September 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#38 of 544)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters
video
5 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
79 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
347 Mendeley
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Title
Ecology of Zoonotic Infectious Diseases in Bats: Current Knowledge and Future Directions
Published in
Zoonoses & Public Health, September 2012
DOI 10.1111/zph.12000
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. T. S. Hayman, R. A. Bowen, P. M. Cryan, G. F. McCracken, T. J. O’Shea, A. J. Peel, A. Gilbert, C. T. Webb, J. L. N. Wood

Abstract

Bats are hosts to a range of zoonotic and potentially zoonotic pathogens. Human activities that increase exposure to bats will likely increase the opportunity for infections to spill over in the future. Ecological drivers of pathogen spillover and emergence in novel hosts, including humans, involve a complex mixture of processes, and understanding these complexities may aid in predicting spillover. In particular, only once the pathogen and host ecologies are known can the impacts of anthropogenic changes be fully appreciated. Cross-disciplinary approaches are required to understand how host and pathogen ecology interact. Bats differ from other sylvatic disease reservoirs because of their unique and diverse lifestyles, including their ability to fly, often highly gregarious social structures, long lifespans and low fecundity rates. We highlight how these traits may affect infection dynamics and how both host and pathogen traits may interact to affect infection dynamics. We identify key questions relating to the ecology of infectious diseases in bats and propose that a combination of field and laboratory studies are needed to create data-driven mechanistic models to elucidate those aspects of bat ecology that are most critical to the dynamics of emerging bat viruses. If commonalities can be found, then predicting the dynamics of newly emerging diseases may be possible. This modelling approach will be particularly important in scenarios when population surveillance data are unavailable and when it is unclear which aspects of host ecology are driving infection dynamics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 347 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 8 2%
United States 7 2%
Germany 3 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
South Africa 2 <1%
China 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Other 6 2%
Unknown 315 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 79 23%
Researcher 69 20%
Student > Master 58 17%
Student > Bachelor 42 12%
Unspecified 23 7%
Other 76 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 180 52%
Unspecified 40 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 27 8%
Environmental Science 24 7%
Other 43 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2016.
All research outputs
#1,071,052
of 12,657,345 outputs
Outputs from Zoonoses & Public Health
#38
of 544 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,198
of 252,303 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Zoonoses & Public Health
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,657,345 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 544 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,303 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.