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Land-use change reduces habitat suitability for supporting managed honey bee colonies in the Northern Great Plains

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
115 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
183 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Land-use change reduces habitat suitability for supporting managed honey bee colonies in the Northern Great Plains
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1603481113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clint R. V. Otto, Cali L. Roth, Benjamin L. Carlson, Matthew D. Smart

Abstract

Human reliance on insect pollination services continues to increase even as pollinator populations exhibit global declines. Increased commodity crop prices and federal subsidies for biofuel crops, such as corn and soybeans, have contributed to rapid land-use change in the US Northern Great Plains (NGP), changes that may jeopardize habitat for honey bees in a part of the country that supports >40% of the US colony stock. We investigated changes in biofuel crop production and grassland land covers surrounding ∼18,000 registered commercial apiaries in North and South Dakota from 2006 to 2014. We then developed habitat selection models to identify remotely sensed land-cover and land-use features that influence apiary site selection by Dakota beekeepers. Our study demonstrates a continual increase in biofuel crops, totaling 1.2 Mha, around registered apiary locations in North and South Dakota. Such crops were avoided by commercial beekeepers when selecting apiary sites in this region. Furthermore, our analysis reveals how grasslands that beekeepers target when selecting commercial apiary locations are becoming less common in eastern North and South Dakota, changes that may have lasting impact on pollinator conservation efforts. Our study highlights how land-use change in the NGP is altering the landscape in ways that are seemingly less conducive to beekeeping. Our models can be used to guide future conservation efforts highlighted in the US national pollinator health strategy by identifying areas that support high densities of commercial apiaries and that have exhibited significant land-use changes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 183 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Spain 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 179 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 21%
Student > Master 34 19%
Researcher 29 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 7%
Student > Bachelor 13 7%
Other 16 9%
Unknown 39 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 36%
Environmental Science 29 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 3%
Engineering 5 3%
Other 15 8%
Unknown 54 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 88. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 August 2017.
All research outputs
#284,112
of 17,361,274 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#5,953
of 89,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,696
of 269,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#163
of 909 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,361,274 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 89,304 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,698 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 909 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.