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Detection of Plasmodium in faeces of the New World primate Alouatta clamitans

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, August 2016
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Title
Detection of Plasmodium in faeces of the New World primate Alouatta clamitans
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, August 2016
DOI 10.1590/0074-02760160222
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gabriela Maíra Pereira de Assis, Denise Anete Madureira de Alvarenga, Daniela Camargos Costa, Júlio César de Souza Junior, Zelinda Maria Braga Hirano, Flora Satiko Kano, Taís Nóbrega de Sousa, Cristiana Ferreira Alves de Brito

Abstract

Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax have evolved with host switches between non-human primates (NHPs) and humans. Studies on the infection dynamics of Plasmodium species in NHPs will improve our understanding of the evolution of these parasites; however, such studies are hampered by the difficulty of handling animals in the field. The aim of this study was to detect genomic DNA of Plasmodium species from the faeces of New World monkeys. Faecal samples from 23 Alouatta clamitans from the Centre for Biological Research of Indaial (Santa Catarina, Brazil) were collected. Extracted DNA from faecal samples was used for molecular diagnosis of malaria by nested polymerase chain reaction. One natural infection with Plasmodium simium was identified by amplification of DNA extracted from the faeces of A. clamitans. Extracted DNA from a captive NHP was also used for parasite genotyping. The detection limit of the technique was evaluated in vitro using an artificial mixture of cultured P. falciparum in NHP faeces and determined to be 6.5 parasites/µL. Faecal samples of New World primates can be used to detect malaria infections in field surveys and also to monitor the genetic variability of parasites and dynamics of infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 2%
Kenya 1 2%
Unknown 52 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 22%
Student > Master 12 22%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 4 7%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2016.
All research outputs
#9,608,299
of 12,511,869 outputs
Outputs from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#670
of 862 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,437
of 260,660 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#8
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,511,869 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 862 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,660 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.