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Plerixafor as preemptive strategy results in high success rates in autologous stem cell mobilization failure

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical Apheresis, August 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

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Citations

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Title
Plerixafor as preemptive strategy results in high success rates in autologous stem cell mobilization failure
Published in
Journal of Clinical Apheresis, August 2016
DOI 10.1002/jca.21496
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nina Worel, Gerhard Fritsch, Hermine Agis, Alexandra Böhm, Georg Engelich, Gerda C. Leitner, Klaus Geissler, Karoline Gleixner, Peter Kalhs, Veronika Buxhofer-Ausch, Felix Keil, Gerhard Kopetzky, Viktor Mayr, Werner Rabitsch, Regina Reisner, Konrad Rosskopf, Reinhard Ruckser, Claudia Zoghlami, Niklas Zojer, Hildegard T Greinix

Abstract

Plerixafor in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is approved for autologous stem cell mobilization in poor mobilizing patients with multiple myeloma or malignant lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of plerixafor in an immediate rescue approach, administrated subsequently to G-CSF alone or chemotherapy and G-CSF in patients at risk for mobilization failure. Eighty-five patients mobilized with G-CSF alone or chemotherapy were included. Primary endpoint was the efficacy of the immediate rescue approach of plerixafor to achieve ≥2.0 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg for a single or ≥5 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg for a double transplantation and potential differences between G-CSF and chemotherapy-based mobilization. Secondary objectives included comparison of stem cell graft composition including CD34(+) cell and lymphocyte subsets with regard to the mobilization regimen applied. No significant adverse events were recorded. A median 3.9-fold increase in CD34(+) cells following plerixafor was observed, resulting in 97% patients achieving at least ≥2 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Significantly more differentiated granulocyte and monocyte forming myeloid progenitors were collected after chemomobilization whereas more CD19(+) and natural killer cells were collected after G-CSF. Fifty-two patients underwent transplantation showing rapid and durable engraftment, irrespectively of the stem cell mobilization regimen used. The addition of plerixafor in an immediate rescue model is efficient and safe after both, G-CSF and chemomobilization and results in extremely high success rates. Whether the differences in graft composition have a clinical impact on engraftment kinetics, immunologic recovery, and graft durability have to be analysed in larger prospective studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 36%
Researcher 2 14%
Professor 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 64%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Unspecified 1 7%
Engineering 1 7%
Unknown 2 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2016.
All research outputs
#9,735,706
of 12,177,962 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical Apheresis
#143
of 228 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,892
of 259,589 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical Apheresis
#9
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,177,962 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 228 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,589 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.