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Effect of Oral Azithromycin vs Placebo on COVID-19 Symptoms in Outpatients With SARS-CoV-2 Infection

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, August 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

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Title
Effect of Oral Azithromycin vs Placebo on COVID-19 Symptoms in Outpatients With SARS-CoV-2 Infection
Published in
JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, August 2021
DOI 10.1001/jama.2021.11517
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine E. Oldenburg, Benjamin A. Pinsky, Jessica Brogdon, Cindi Chen, Kevin Ruder, Lina Zhong, Fanice Nyatigo, Catherine A. Cook, Armin Hinterwirth, Elodie Lebas, Travis Redd, Travis C. Porco, Thomas M. Lietman, Benjamin F. Arnold, Thuy Doan

Abstract

Azithromycin has been hypothesized to have activity against SARS-CoV-2. To determine whether oral azithromycin in outpatients with SARS-CoV-2 infection leads to absence of self-reported COVID-19 symptoms at day 14. Randomized clinical trial of azithromycin vs matching placebo conducted from May 2020 through March 2021. Outpatients from the US were enrolled remotely via internet-based surveys and followed up for 21 days. Eligible participants had a positive SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic test result (nucleic acid amplification or antigen) within 7 days prior to enrollment, were aged 18 years or older, and were not hospitalized at the time of enrollment. Among 604 individuals screened, 297 were ineligible, 44 refused participation, and 263 were enrolled. Participants, investigators, and study staff were masked to treatment randomization. Participants were randomized in a 2:1 fashion to a single oral 1.2-g dose of azithromycin (n = 171) or matching placebo (n = 92). The primary outcome was absence of self-reported COVID-19 symptoms at day 14. There were 23 secondary clinical end points, including all-cause hospitalization at day 21. Among 263 participants who were randomized (median age, 43 years; 174 [66%] women; 57% non-Hispanic White and 29% Latinx/Hispanic), 76% completed the trial. The trial was terminated by the data and safety monitoring committee for futility after the interim analysis. At day 14, there was no significant difference in proportion of participants who were symptom free (azithromycin: 50%; placebo: 50%; prevalence difference, 0%; 95% CI, -14% to 15%; P > .99). Of 23 prespecified secondary clinical end points, 18 showed no significant difference. By day 21, 5 participants in the azithromycin group had been hospitalized compared with 0 in the placebo group (prevalence difference, 4%; 95% CI, -1% to 9%; P = .16). Among outpatients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, treatment with a single dose of azithromycin compared with placebo did not result in greater likelihood of being symptom free at day 14. These findings do not support the routine use of azithromycin for outpatient SARS-CoV-2 infection. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04332107.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 92 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 16%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Other 11 12%
Student > Master 10 11%
Professor 6 7%
Other 16 17%
Unknown 22 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 26 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1304. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2021.
All research outputs
#6,127
of 19,562,105 outputs
Outputs from JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association
#210
of 30,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#391
of 334,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association
#9
of 299 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,562,105 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 30,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 68.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 334,017 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 299 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.