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Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Digestible Carbohydrate Intake Are Not Associated with Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Eight European Countries

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nutrition, November 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
35 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Digestible Carbohydrate Intake Are Not Associated with Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Eight European Countries
Published in
Journal of Nutrition, November 2012
DOI 10.3945/jn.112.165605
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ivonne Sluijs, Joline W. J. Beulens, Yvonne T. van der Schouw, Daphne L. van der A, Genevieve Buckland, Anneleen Kuijsten, Matthias B. Schulze, Pilar Amiano, Eva Ardanaz, Beverley Balkau, Heiner Boeing, Diana Gavrila, Verena A. Grote, Timothy J. Key, Kuanrong Li, Peter Nilsson, Kim Overvad, Domenico Palli, Salvatore Panico, J. R. Quirós, Olov Rolandsson, Nina Roswall, Carlotta Sacerdote, María-José Sánchez, Sabina Sieri, Nadia Slimani, Annemieke M. W. Spijkerman, Anne Tjønneland, Rosario Tumino, Stephen J. Sharp, Claudia Langenberg, Edith J. M. Feskens, Nita G. Forouhi, Elio Riboli, Nicholas J. Wareham

Abstract

The association of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with the risk of type 2 diabetes remains unclear. We investigated associations of dietary GI, GL, and digestible carbohydrate with incident type 2 diabetes. We performed a case-cohort study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Study, including a random subcohort (n = 16,835) and incident type 2 diabetes cases (n = 12,403). The median follow-up time was 12 y. Baseline dietary intakes were assessed using country-specific dietary questionnaires. Country-specific HR were calculated and pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Dietary GI, GL, and digestible carbohydrate in the subcohort were (mean ± SD) 56 ± 4, 127 ± 23, and 226 ± 36 g/d, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, GI and GL were not associated with incident diabetes [HR highest vs. lowest quartile (HR(Q4)) for GI: 1.05 (95% CI = 0.96, 1.16); HR(Q4) for GL: 1.07 (95% CI = 0.95, 1.20)]. Digestible carbohydrate intake was not associated with incident diabetes [HR(Q4): 0.98 (95% CI = 0.86, 1.10)]. In additional analyses, we found that discrepancies in the GI value assignment to foods possibly explain differences in GI associations with diabetes within the same study population. In conclusion, an expansion of the GI tables and systematic GI value assignment to foods may be needed to improve the validity of GI values derived in such studies, after which GI associations may need reevaluation. Our study shows that digestible carbohydrate intake is not associated with diabetes risk and suggests that diabetes risk with high-GI and -GL diets may be more modest than initial studies suggested.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Denmark 1 1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 67 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 25%
Researcher 16 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Unspecified 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 18 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 38%
Unspecified 14 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 7 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2017.
All research outputs
#510,074
of 13,253,853 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nutrition
#506
of 6,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,152
of 248,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nutrition
#2
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,253,853 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,795 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.