↓ Skip to main content

A photosynthetic alveolate closely related to apicomplexan parasites

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, February 2008
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
290 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
326 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
connotea
2 Connotea
Title
A photosynthetic alveolate closely related to apicomplexan parasites
Published in
Nature, February 2008
DOI 10.1038/nature06635
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert B. Moore, Miroslav Oborník, Jan Janouškovec, Tomáš Chrudimský, Marie Vancová, David H. Green, Simon W. Wright, Noel W. Davies, Christopher J. S. Bolch, Kirsten Heimann, Jan Šlapeta, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, John M. Logsdon, Dee A. Carter

Abstract

Many parasitic Apicomplexa, such as Plasmodium falciparum, contain an unpigmented chloroplast remnant termed the apicoplast, which is a target for malaria treatment. However, no close relative of apicomplexans with a functional photosynthetic plastid has yet been described. Here we describe a newly cultured organism that has ultrastructural features typical for alveolates, is phylogenetically related to apicomplexans, and contains a photosynthetic plastid. The plastid is surrounded by four membranes, is pigmented by chlorophyll a, and uses the codon UGA to encode tryptophan in the psbA gene. This genetic feature has been found only in coccidian apicoplasts and various mitochondria. The UGA-Trp codon and phylogenies of plastid and nuclear ribosomal RNA genes indicate that the organism is the closest known photosynthetic relative to apicomplexan parasites and that its plastid shares an origin with the apicoplasts. The discovery of this organism provides a powerful model with which to study the evolution of parasitism in Apicomplexa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 326 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 8 2%
United States 4 1%
United Kingdom 4 1%
Japan 4 1%
Canada 4 1%
France 3 <1%
Colombia 3 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Czechia 2 <1%
Other 17 5%
Unknown 275 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 87 27%
Researcher 85 26%
Student > Master 30 9%
Student > Bachelor 24 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 23 7%
Other 77 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 223 68%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 8%
Unspecified 23 7%
Environmental Science 11 3%
Chemistry 9 3%
Other 34 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 41. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2017.
All research outputs
#326,610
of 11,812,338 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#16,597
of 60,388 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#319,846
of 11,158,153 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#16,193
of 59,825 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,812,338 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 60,388 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 72.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,158,153 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59,825 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.