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Suicide first aid guidelines for Sri Lanka: a Delphi consensus study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Mental Health Systems, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

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3 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Suicide first aid guidelines for Sri Lanka: a Delphi consensus study
Published in
International Journal of Mental Health Systems, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13033-016-0085-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saranga A. Silva, Erminia Colucci, Jayan Mendis, Claire M. Kelly, Anthony F. Jorm, Harry Minas, De Silva, Saranga A, Colucci, Erminia, Mendis, Jayan, Kelly, Claire M, Jorm, Anthony F, Minas, Harry, Saranga A. De Silva

Abstract

Sri Lanka has one of the highest suicide rates in the world. Gatekeeper programs aimed at specific target groups could be a promising suicide prevention strategy in the country. The aim of this study was to develop guidelines that help members of the public to provide first aid to persons in Sri Lanka who are at risk of suicide. The Delphi method was used to elicit consensus on potential helping statements to include in the guidelines. These statements describe information members of the public should have and actions they can take to help a person who is experiencing suicidal thoughts. An expert panel, comprised of mental health and suicide experts in Sri Lanka, rated each statement. The panellists were encouraged to suggest any additional action that was not included in the original questionnaire and, in particular, to include items that were culturally appropriate or gender specific. Responses to open-ended questions were used to generate new items. These items were included in the subsequent Delphi rounds. Three Delphi rounds were carried out. Statements were accepted for inclusion in the guidelines if they were endorsed (rated as essential or important) by at least 80 % of the panel. Statements endorsed by 70-79 % of the panel were re-rated in the following round. Statements with less than 70 % endorsement, or re-rated items that did not receive 80 % or higher endorsement were rejected. The output from the Delphi process was a set of endorsed statements. In the first round questionnaire 473 statements were presented to the panel and 58 new items were generated from responses to the open-ended questions. Of the total 531 statements presented, 304 were endorsed. These statements were used to develop the suicide first aid guidelines for Sri Lanka. By engaging Sri Lankans who are experts in the field of mental health or suicide this research developed culturally appropriate guidelines for providing mental health first aid to a person at risk of suicide in Sri Lanka. The guidelines may serve as a basis for developing training for members of the public to provide mental health first aid to persons at risk of suicide as part of Sri Lanka's suicide prevention strategy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 65 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 9 14%
Researcher 8 12%
Other 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Student > Master 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 21 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 14%
Social Sciences 7 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 21 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2016.
All research outputs
#3,553,866
of 8,414,405 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#192
of 314 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,878
of 252,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#6
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,414,405 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 314 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,654 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.