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Episodic Memory and Appetite Regulation in Humans

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
61 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
69 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Episodic Memory and Appetite Regulation in Humans
Published in
PLoS ONE, December 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0050707
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey M. Brunstrom, Jeremy F. Burn, Nicola R. Sell, Jane M. Collingwood, Peter J. Rogers, Laura L. Wilkinson, Elanor C. Hinton, Olivia M. Maynard, Danielle Ferriday

Abstract

Psychological and neurobiological evidence implicates hippocampal-dependent memory processes in the control of hunger and food intake. In humans, these have been revealed in the hyperphagia that is associated with amnesia. However, it remains unclear whether 'memory for recent eating' plays a significant role in neurologically intact humans. In this study we isolated the extent to which memory for a recently consumed meal influences hunger and fullness over a three-hour period. Before lunch, half of our volunteers were shown 300 ml of soup and half were shown 500 ml. Orthogonal to this, half consumed 300 ml and half consumed 500 ml. This process yielded four separate groups (25 volunteers in each). Independent manipulation of the 'actual' and 'perceived' soup portion was achieved using a computer-controlled peristaltic pump. This was designed to either refill or draw soup from a soup bowl in a covert manner. Immediately after lunch, self-reported hunger was influenced by the actual and not the perceived amount of soup consumed. However, two and three hours after meal termination this pattern was reversed - hunger was predicted by the perceived amount and not the actual amount. Participants who thought they had consumed the larger 500-ml portion reported significantly less hunger. This was also associated with an increase in the 'expected satiation' of the soup 24-hours later. For the first time, this manipulation exposes the independent and important contribution of memory processes to satiety. Opportunities exist to capitalise on this finding to reduce energy intake in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
Italy 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Unknown 118 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 27%
Student > Master 21 17%
Researcher 17 13%
Student > Bachelor 15 12%
Professor 9 7%
Other 26 20%
Unknown 5 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 43 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 9%
Neuroscience 9 7%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Other 28 22%
Unknown 14 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 271. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2019.
All research outputs
#53,487
of 14,729,970 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#1,102
of 151,466 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#511
of 251,875 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#25
of 6,446 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,729,970 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 151,466 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,875 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,446 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.