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Characterization of Atlantic Cod Spawning Habitat and Behavior in Icelandic Coastal Waters

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, December 2012
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Title
Characterization of Atlantic Cod Spawning Habitat and Behavior in Icelandic Coastal Waters
Published in
PLoS ONE, December 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0051321
Pubmed ID
Authors

Timothy B. Grabowski, Kevin M. Boswell, Bruce J. McAdam, R. J. David Wells, Guđrún Marteinsdóttir

Abstract

The physical habitat used during spawning may potentially be an important factor affecting reproductive output of broadcast spawning marine fishes, particularly for species with complex, substrate-oriented mating systems and behaviors, such as Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. We characterized the habitat use and behavior of spawning Atlantic cod at two locations off the coast of southwestern Iceland during a 2-d research cruise (15-16 April 2009). We simultaneously operated two different active hydroacoustic gear types, a split beam echosounder and a dual frequency imaging sonar (DIDSON), as well as a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV). A total of five fish species were identified through ROV surveys: including cusk Brosme brosme, Atlantic cod, haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus, lemon sole Microstomus kitt, and Atlantic redfish Sebastes spp. Of the three habitats identified in the acoustic surveys, the transitional habitat between boulder/lava field and sand habitats was characterized by greater fish density and acoustic target strength compared to that of sand or boulder/lava field habitats independently. Atlantic cod were observed behaving in a manner consistent with published descriptions of spawning. Individuals were observed ascending 1-5 m into the water column from the bottom at an average vertical swimming speed of 0.20-0.25 m s(-1) and maintained an average spacing of 1.0-1.4 m between individuals. Our results suggest that cod do not choose spawning locations indiscriminately despite the fact that it is a broadcast spawning fish with planktonic eggs that are released well above the seafloor.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Iceland 1 3%
Germany 1 3%
Unknown 34 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 24%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 66%
Environmental Science 4 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 5%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Unknown 6 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2012.
All research outputs
#10,719,805
of 12,088,621 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#113,276
of 132,964 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#246,552
of 291,402 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#5,150
of 6,484 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,088,621 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 132,964 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,402 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,484 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.