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The Eye in the Sky: Combined Use of Unmanned Aerial Systems and GPS Data Loggers for Ecological Research and Conservation of Small Birds

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
219 Mendeley
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Title
The Eye in the Sky: Combined Use of Unmanned Aerial Systems and GPS Data Loggers for Ecological Research and Conservation of Small Birds
Published in
PLoS ONE, December 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0050336
Pubmed ID
Authors

Airam Rodríguez, Juan J. Negro, Mara Mulero, Carlos Rodríguez, Jesús Hernández-Pliego, Javier Bustamante

Abstract

Technological advances for wildlife monitoring have expanded our ability to study behavior and space use of many species. But biotelemetry is limited by size, weight, data memory and battery power of the attached devices, especially in animals with light body masses, such as the majority of bird species. In this study, we describe the combined use of GPS data logger information obtained from free-ranging birds, and environmental information recorded by unmanned aerial systems (UASs). As a case study, we studied habitat selection of a small raptorial bird, the lesser kestrel Falco naumanni, foraging in a highly dynamic landscape. After downloading spatio-temporal information from data loggers attached to the birds, we programmed the UASs to fly and take imagery by means of an onboard digital camera documenting the flight paths of those same birds shortly after their recorded flights. This methodology permitted us to extract environmental information at quasi-real time. We demonstrate that UASs are a useful tool for a wide variety of wildlife studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 219 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Mexico 3 1%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Spain 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 201 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 21%
Student > Master 43 20%
Researcher 35 16%
Other 22 10%
Student > Bachelor 19 9%
Other 35 16%
Unknown 18 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 108 49%
Environmental Science 46 21%
Engineering 10 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 4%
Social Sciences 5 2%
Other 18 8%
Unknown 24 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2019.
All research outputs
#1,163,423
of 16,056,369 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#17,137
of 158,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,792
of 260,272 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#609
of 6,524 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,056,369 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 158,167 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,272 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,524 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.