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Two randomized controlled clinical trials to study the effectiveness of prednisolone treatment in preventing and restoring clinical nerve function loss in leprosy: the TENLEP study protocols

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, December 2012
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Two randomized controlled clinical trials to study the effectiveness of prednisolone treatment in preventing and restoring clinical nerve function loss in leprosy: the TENLEP study protocols
Published in
BMC Neurology, December 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2377-12-159
Pubmed ID
Authors

Inge Wagenaar, Wim Brandsma, Erik Post, Wim van Brakel, Diana Lockwood, Peter Nicholls, Paul Saunderson, Cairns Smith, Einar Wilder-Smith, Jan Hendrik Richardus

Abstract

Nerve damage in leprosy often causes disabilities and deformities. Prednisolone is used to treat nerve function impairment (NFI). However, optimal dose and duration of prednisolone treatment has not been established yet. Besides treating existing NFI it would be desirable to prevent NFI. Studies show that before NFI is clinically detectable, nerves often show subclinical damage. Within the 'Treatment of Early Neuropathy in LEProsy' (TENLEP) study two double blind randomized controlled trials (RCT) will be carried out: a trial to establish whether prednisolone treatment of 32 weeks duration is more effective than 20 weeks in restoring nerve function in leprosy patients with clinical NFI (Clinical trial) and a trial to determine whether prednisolone treatment of early sub-clinical NFI can prevent clinical NFI (Subclinical trial).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Researcher 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 4 7%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 13%
Psychology 3 5%
Arts and Humanities 3 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 12 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2021.
All research outputs
#11,518,831
of 20,513,123 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#867
of 2,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,250
of 285,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#58
of 154 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,513,123 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,185 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,143 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.