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Sexual health of Latino migrant day labourers under conditions of structural vulnerability

Overview of attention for article published in Culture, Health & Sexuality, January 2013
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
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Title
Sexual health of Latino migrant day labourers under conditions of structural vulnerability
Published in
Culture, Health & Sexuality, January 2013
DOI 10.1080/13691058.2012.740075
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kurt C. Organista, Paula A. Worby, James Quesada, Sonya G. Arreola, Alex H. Kral, Sahar Khoury

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore the context of the sexual health of Latino migrant day labourers in the USA, challenges to sexual health and ways of coping, with attention to conditions of structural vulnerability permeating the lives of this unique Latino population. Given the limited information about this topic and population, ethnographic research employing in-depth semi-structured interviews with 51 labourers, recruited through purposive sampling in the San Francisco Bay Area, was utilised. The sexual health aspirations of the men are deeply embedded in the core value and practice of Latino familismo or, in this case, the central goal of securing a family headed by men as providers and present husbands/fathers. However, such goals are frequently thwarted by the poverty engendering work and prolonged separations from home that characterise predominantly undocumented day labour in the USA. Resulting goal frustration, combined with pent up sexual urges, often lead to sexual risk in spite of efforts to cope with challenges to sexual health. Unless community-, state- and national-level interventions are developed to mitigate the pronounced structural vulnerability of migrant day labourers, individual level interventions to promote sexual health, and decrease risk and distress, are likely to have diminishing returns.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 51 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 21%
Student > Master 8 15%
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 12 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Psychology 3 6%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 11 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2017.
All research outputs
#10,375,485
of 16,252,997 outputs
Outputs from Culture, Health & Sexuality
#780
of 1,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,440
of 263,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Culture, Health & Sexuality
#11
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,252,997 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,044 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,044 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.