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Nanoscale optical and electrical characterization of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

Overview of attention for article published in Nanoscale Research Letters, December 2012
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Title
Nanoscale optical and electrical characterization of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes
Published in
Nanoscale Research Letters, December 2012
DOI 10.1186/1556-276x-7-682
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raul D Rodriguez, Marius Toader, Sascha Hermann, Evgeniya Sheremet, Susanne Müller, Ovidiu D Gordan, Haibo Yu, Stefan E Schulz, Michael Hietschold, Dietrich RT Zahn

Abstract

During the recent years, a significant amount of research has been performed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a channel material in thin-film transistors (Pham et al. IEEE Trans Nanotechnol 11:44-50, 2012). This has prompted the application of advanced characterization techniques based on combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy studies (Mureau et al. Electrophoresis 29:2266-2271, 2008). In this context, we use confocal Raman microscopy and current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) to study phonons and the electronic transport in semiconducting SWCNTs, which were aligned between palladium electrodes using dielectrophoresis (Kuzyk Electrophoresis 32:2307-2313, 2011). Raman imaging was performed in the region around the electrodes on the suspended CNTs using several laser excitation wavelengths. Analysis of the G+/G- splitting in the Raman spectra (Sgobba and Guldi Chem Soc Rev 38:165-184, 2009) shows CNT diameters of 2.5 ± 0.3 nm. Neither surface modification nor increase in defect density or stress at the CNT-electrode contact could be detected, but rather a shift in G+ and G- peak positions in regions with high CNT density between the electrodes. Simultaneous topographical and electrical characterization of the CNT transistor by CS-AFM confirms the presence of CNT bundles having a stable electrical contact with the transistor electrodes. For a similar load force, reproducible current-voltage (I/V) curves for the same CNT regions verify the stability of the electrical contact between the nanotube and the electrodes as well as the nanotube and the AFM tip over different experimental sessions using different AFM tips. Strong variations observed in the I/V response at different regions of the CNT transistor are discussed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Russia 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 37%
Unspecified 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Other 8 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 7 26%
Unspecified 6 22%
Engineering 5 19%
Materials Science 3 11%
Chemistry 2 7%
Other 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2012.
All research outputs
#2,900,459
of 3,629,660 outputs
Outputs from Nanoscale Research Letters
#89
of 380 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,771
of 278,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nanoscale Research Letters
#18
of 120 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,629,660 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 380 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,244 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 120 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.