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Spanish Research Network on Drugs in Hospital Emergency Departments - the REDUrHE registry: general analysis and comparisons between weekend and weekday poisonings

Overview of attention for article published in Emergencias : revista de la Sociedad Espanola de Medicina de Emergencias, October 2021
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Title
Spanish Research Network on Drugs in Hospital Emergency Departments - the REDUrHE registry: general analysis and comparisons between weekend and weekday poisonings
Published in
Emergencias : revista de la Sociedad Espanola de Medicina de Emergencias, October 2021
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ibrahim-Achi, Dima, Miró, Òscar, Galicia, Miguel, Supervía, August, Puiguriguer Ferrando, Jordi, Ortega Pérez, Joan, Leciñena, María Ángeles, Venegas de L'Hotellerie, M ª José, Rodríguez Miranda, Belén, Martínez-Sánchez, Lidia, Bajo Bajo, Ángel, Martín-Pérez, Beatriz, Dueñas-Laita, Antonio, Ferrer Dufol, Ana, Callado-Moro, Francisco, Nogué-Xarau, Santiago, Burillo-Putze, Guillermo, ,

Abstract

To describe the sociodemographic characteristics, drug use patterns, and the severity of drug overdoses treated in hospital emergency departments according to the registry of the Spanish Research Network on Drugs in Hospital Emergency Departments (REDUrHE project), and to identify differences between patterns on weekdays and weekends/national holidays. Eleven hospitals participated in the REDUrHE project, studying consecutive patients with symptoms of drug overdose over a 24-month period. The drugs implicated were extracted from clinical records or toxicology reports. An overdose was considered severe if management required intubation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or admission to the intensive care unit, or if in-hospital death occurred (composite event). Each of these variables was also analyzed by itself. A total of 4526 patients were studied (2218 [49%] on weekends/holidays; 2308 [51%] on workdays). The mean (SD) age was 33 (11) years, and 75.5% were men. The most commonly used drugs were cocaine (47.8%), paciencannabis (44.4%), amphetamine derivatives (25.5%), benzodiazepines (8.8%), and opioids (7.3%). Patients treated on weekends/holidays were younger (32.1 vs 33.1 years on weekdays, P = .006), and they were more often taken to the hospital in an ambulance (60.5% vs 57.3%, P = .035). Hospitals in large cities (Barcelona and Madrid) saw more patients on weekends/holidays (55.8%). Major tourist destinations (the Balearic and Canary Islands) saw fewer patients on weekends/holidays (44.7%, P .001). Alcohol was ingested along with a drug by 58.2%; this combination was more common on weekends/holidays (in 63.3% vs 52.9% on weekdays, P .001), and 39.4% used more than 1 drug. Use of more than 1 drug was less common on weekends (in 37.6% vs 41.2%, P = .013). Opioid emergencies were also less frequent on weekends (6.0% vs 8.6%, P = .001), when gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) overdoses were more common (5.8% vs 3.6%, P .001). Severity indicators were present (the composite event) more often on weekends (in 3.6% vs 2.2%, P = .006). Likewise, weekends saw more intubations (in 2.3% vs 1.0%, P = .001) and intensive care unit admissions (2.4% vs 1.6%, P = .047). Twelve patients (0.3%) died; mortality was similar on weekends (0.2%) and weekdays (0.3%) (P = .826). After adjusting for age, sex, combined use of alcohol, and type of drug, the risk of the severe-event composite was greater on weekends (odds ratio, 1.569; 95% CI, 1.088-2.263). Weekend and holiday emergencies due to drug overdoses are more frequent in large city hospitals. Weekend emergencies share certain distinctive characteristics: patients are younger, alcohol more often is ingested with drugs but multiple-drug combinations are less common, and GHB is used more often while opioids are used less often. Severe poisonings occur more often on weekends and holidays.

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 44%
Librarian 1 11%
Lecturer 1 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 33%
Unknown 2 22%