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Conquering the Sahara and Arabian deserts: systematics and biogeography of Stenodactylus geckos (Reptilia: Gekkonidae)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
99 Mendeley
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Title
Conquering the Sahara and Arabian deserts: systematics and biogeography of Stenodactylus geckos (Reptilia: Gekkonidae)
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-12-258
Pubmed ID
Authors

Margarita Metallinou, Edwin Nicholas Arnold, Pierre-André Crochet, Philippe Geniez, José Carlos Brito, Petros Lymberakis, Sherif Baha El Din, Roberto Sindaco, Michael Robinson, Salvador Carranza

Abstract

The evolutionary history of the biota of North Africa and Arabia is inextricably tied to the complex geological and climatic evolution that gave rise to the prevalent deserts of these areas. Reptiles constitute an exemplary group in the study of the arid environments with numerous well-adapted members, while recent studies using reptiles as models have unveiled interesting biogeographical and diversification patterns. In this study, we include 207 specimens belonging to all 12 recognized species of the genus Stenodactylus. Molecular phylogenies inferred using two mitochondrial (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA) and two nuclear (c-mos and RAG-2) markers are employed to obtain a robust time-calibrated phylogeny, as the base to investigate the inter- and intraspecific relationships and to elucidate the biogeographical history of Stenodactylus, a genus with a large distribution range including the arid and hyper-arid areas of North Africa and Arabia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 3 3%
Spain 3 3%
France 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
United Arab Emirates 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Sudan 1 1%
Unknown 85 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 24%
Student > Master 15 15%
Student > Bachelor 14 14%
Researcher 11 11%
Other 6 6%
Other 20 20%
Unknown 9 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 62%
Environmental Science 11 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 8%
Computer Science 2 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 1%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 11 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2021.
All research outputs
#3,033,609
of 18,990,581 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#790
of 2,840 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,893
of 272,789 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#46
of 206 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,990,581 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,840 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,789 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 206 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.