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The Genetics of Vitamin C Loss in Vertebrates

Overview of attention for article published in Current Genomics, August 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 438)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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Readers on

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355 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
The Genetics of Vitamin C Loss in Vertebrates
Published in
Current Genomics, August 2011
DOI 10.2174/138920211796429736
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guy Drouin, Jean-Remi Godin, Benoit Page

Abstract

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) plays important roles as an anti-oxidant and in collagen synthesis. These important roles, and the relatively large amounts of vitamin C required daily, likely explain why most vertebrate species are able to synthesize this compound. Surprisingly, many species, such as teleost fishes, anthropoid primates, guinea pigs, as well as some bat and Passeriformes bird species, have lost the capacity to synthesize it. Here, we review the genetic bases behind the repeated losses in the ability to synthesize vitamin C as well as their implications. In all cases so far studied, the inability to synthesize vitamin C is due to mutations in the L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (GLO) gene which codes for the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the last step of vitamin C biosynthesis. The bias for mutations in this particular gene is likely due to the fact that losing it only affects vitamin C production. Whereas the GLO gene mutations in fish, anthropoid primates and guinea pigs are irreversible, some of the GLO pseudogenes found in bat species have been shown to be reactivated during evolution. The same phenomenon is thought to have occurred in some Passeriformes bird species. Interestingly, these GLO gene losses and reactivations are unrelated to the diet of the species involved. This suggests that losing the ability to make vitamin C is a neutral trait.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 84 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 355 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Egypt 1 <1%
Unknown 349 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 73 21%
Student > Master 58 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 12%
Researcher 28 8%
Other 14 4%
Other 55 15%
Unknown 84 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 83 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 63 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 15 4%
Chemistry 13 4%
Other 51 14%
Unknown 97 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 160. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2022.
All research outputs
#195,012
of 21,807,934 outputs
Outputs from Current Genomics
#4
of 438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,589
of 294,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Genomics
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,807,934 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,838 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them