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Deletion of the late cornified envelope LCE3B and LCE3C genes as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Genetics, January 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
patent
5 patents

Citations

dimensions_citation
376 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
196 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Deletion of the late cornified envelope LCE3B and LCE3C genes as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis
Published in
Nature Genetics, January 2009
DOI 10.1038/ng.313
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rafael de Cid, Eva Riveira-Munoz, Patrick L J M Zeeuwen, Jason Robarge, Wilson Liao, Emma N Dannhauser, Emiliano Giardina, Philip E Stuart, Rajan Nair, Cynthia Helms, Georgia Escaramís, Ester Ballana, Gemma Martín-Ezquerra, Martin den Heijer, Marijke Kamsteeg, Irma Joosten, Evan E Eichler, Conxi Lázaro, Ramón M Pujol, Lluís Armengol, Gonçalo Abecasis, James T Elder, Giuseppe Novelli, John A L Armour, Pui-Yan Kwok, Anne Bowcock, Joost Schalkwijk, Xavier Estivill

Abstract

Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with a prevalence of 2-3% in individuals of European ancestry. In a genome-wide search for copy number variants (CNV) using a sample pooling approach, we have identified a deletion comprising LCE3B and LCE3C, members of the late cornified envelope (LCE) gene cluster. The absence of LCE3B and LCE3C (LCE3C_LCE3B-del) is significantly associated (P = 1.38E-08) with risk of psoriasis in 2,831 samples from Spain, The Netherlands, Italy and the United States, and in a family-based study (P = 5.4E-04). LCE3C_LCE3B-del is tagged by rs4112788 (r(2) = 0.93), which is also strongly associated with psoriasis (P < 6.6E-09). LCE3C_LCE3B-del shows epistatic effects with the HLA-Cw6 allele on the development of psoriasis in Dutch samples and multiplicative effects in the other samples. LCE expression can be induced in normal epidermis by skin barrier disruption and is strongly expressed in psoriatic lesions, suggesting that compromised skin barrier function has a role in psoriasis susceptibility.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 196 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 2%
Spain 4 2%
Germany 3 2%
Canada 2 1%
Japan 2 1%
Israel 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 177 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 54 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 25%
Professor > Associate Professor 15 8%
Professor 13 7%
Student > Master 13 7%
Other 40 20%
Unknown 12 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 69 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 50 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 11%
Computer Science 7 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 3%
Other 27 14%
Unknown 15 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2019.
All research outputs
#898,867
of 14,904,292 outputs
Outputs from Nature Genetics
#1,659
of 6,375 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#862,357
of 14,042,226 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Genetics
#1,655
of 6,369 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,904,292 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,375 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 14,042,226 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,369 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.