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Lipidomics of Alzheimer's disease: current status

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, January 2012
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Title
Lipidomics of Alzheimer's disease: current status
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/alzrt103
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul L Wood

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a cognitive disorder with a number of complex neuropathologies, including, but not limited to, neurofibrillary tangles, neuritic plaques, neuronal shrinkage, hypomyelination, neuroinflammation and cholinergic dysfunction. The role of underlying pathological processes in the evolution of the cholinergic deficit responsible for cognitive decline has not been elucidated. Furthermore, generation of testable hypotheses for defining points of pharmacological intervention in AD are complicated by the large scale occurrence of older individuals dying with no cognitive impairment despite having a high burden of AD pathology (plaques and tangles). To further complicate these research challenges, there is no animal model that reproduces the combined hallmark neuropathologies of AD. These research limitations have stimulated the application of 'omics' technologies in AD research with the goals of defining biologic markers of disease and disease progression and uncovering potential points of pharmacological intervention for the design of AD therapeutics. In the case of sporadic AD, the dominant form of dementia, genomics has revealed that the ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E, a lipid transport/chaperone protein, is a susceptibility factor. This seminal observation points to the importance of lipid dynamics as an area of investigation in AD. In this regard, lipidomics studies have demonstrated that there are major deficits in brain structural glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids, as well as alterations in metabolites of these complex structural lipids, which act as signaling molecules. Peroxisomal dysfunction appears to be a key component of the changes in glycerophospholipid deficits. In this review, lipid alterations and their potential roles in the pathophysiology of AD are discussed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 159 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Unknown 155 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 25%
Researcher 28 18%
Student > Master 26 16%
Student > Bachelor 11 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 23 14%
Unknown 23 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 12%
Neuroscience 16 10%
Chemistry 14 9%
Other 19 12%
Unknown 28 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2012.
All research outputs
#11,176,430
of 12,561,272 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#525
of 539 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#216,074
of 256,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#32
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,561,272 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.