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A molecular and genetic outline of cardiac morphogenesis

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Physiologica, February 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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53 Dimensions

Readers on

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91 Mendeley
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Title
A molecular and genetic outline of cardiac morphogenesis
Published in
Acta Physiologica, February 2013
DOI 10.1111/apha.12061
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rana, M. S., Christoffels, V. M., Moorman, A. F. M.

Abstract

Perturbations in cardiac development result in congenital heart disease, the leading cause of birth defect-related infant morbidity and mortality. Advances in cardiac developmental biology have significantly augmented our understanding of signalling pathways and transcriptional networks underlying heart formation. Cardiogenesis is initiated with the formation of mesodermal multipotent cardiac progenitor cells and is governed by cross-talk between developmental cues emanating from endodermal, mesodermal and ectodermal cells. The molecular and transcriptional machineries that direct the specification and differentiation of these cardiac precursors are part of an evolutionarily conserved programme that includes the Nkx-, Gata-, Hand-, T-box- and Mef2 family of transcription factors. Unravelling the hierarchical networks governing the fate and differentiation of cardiac precursors is crucial for our understanding of congenital heart disease and future stem cell-based and gene therapies. Recent molecular and genetic lineage analyses have revealed that subpopulations of cardiac progenitor cells follow distinctive specification and differentiation paths, which determine their final contribution to the heart. In the last decade, progenitor cells that contribute to the arterial pole and right ventricle have received much attention, as abnormal development of these cells frequently results in congenital defects of the aortic and pulmonary outlets, representing the most commonly occurring congenital cardiac defects. In this review, we provide an overview of the building plan of the vertebrate four-chambered heart, with a special focus on cardiac progenitor cell specification, differentiation and deployment during arterial pole development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 90 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 30%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Student > Master 6 7%
Other 14 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 46%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 16%
Engineering 6 7%
Unspecified 3 3%
Other 6 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2013.
All research outputs
#2,976,355
of 6,327,733 outputs
Outputs from Acta Physiologica
#234
of 513 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,168
of 281,104 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Physiologica
#28
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,327,733 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 513 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,104 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.