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Chemical contaminants in water and sediment near fish nesting sites in the Potomac River basin: Determining potential exposures to smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu)

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, January 2013
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Title
Chemical contaminants in water and sediment near fish nesting sites in the Potomac River basin: Determining potential exposures to smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu)
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, January 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.09.063
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dana W. Kolpin, Vicki S. Blazer, James L. Gray, Michael J. Focazio, John A. Young, David A. Alvarez, Luke R. Iwanowicz, William T. Foreman, Edward T. Furlong, Gary K. Speiran, Steven D. Zaugg, Laura E. Hubbard, Michael T. Meyer, Mark W. Sandstrom, Larry B. Barber

Abstract

The Potomac River basin is an area where a high prevalence of abnormalities such as testicular oocytes (TO), skin lesions, and mortality has been observed in smallmouth bass (SMB, Micropterus dolomieu). Previous research documented a variety of chemicals in regional streams, implicating chemical exposure as one plausible explanation for these biological effects. Six stream sites in the Potomac basin (and one out-of-basin reference site) were sampled to provide an assessment of chemicals in these streams. Potential early life-stage exposure to chemicals detected was assessed by collecting samples in and around SMB nesting areas. Target chemicals included those known to be associated with important agricultural and municipal wastewater sources in the Potomac basin. The prevalence and severity of TO in SMB were also measured to determine potential relations between chemistry and biological effects. A total of 39 chemicals were detected at least once in the discrete-water samples, with atrazine, caffeine, deethylatrazine, simazine, and iso-chlorotetracycline being most frequently detected. Of the most frequently detected chemicals, only caffeine was detected in water from the reference site. No biogenic hormones/sterols were detected in the discrete-water samples. In contrast, 100 chemicals (including six biogenic hormones/sterols) were found in a least one passive-water sample, with 25 being detected at all such samples. In addition, 46 chemicals (including seven biogenic hormones/sterols) were found in the bed-sediment samples, with caffeine, cholesterol, indole, para-cresol, and sitosterol detected in all such samples. The number of herbicides detected in discrete-water samples per site had a significant positive relation to TO(rank) (a nonparametric indicator of TO), with significant positive relations between TO(rank) and atrazine concentrations in discrete-water samples and to total hormone/sterol concentration in bed-sediment samples. Such significant correlations do not necessarily imply causation, as these chemical compositions and concentrations likely do not adequately reflect total SMB exposure history, particularly during critical life stages.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Unknown 96 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 21%
Student > Master 17 17%
Researcher 16 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 7%
Other 18 18%
Unknown 11 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 27 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 18%
Chemistry 14 14%
Engineering 3 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 24 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2013.
All research outputs
#9,902,185
of 15,557,520 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#9,187
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,507
of 261,668 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#61
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,668 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.