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Clonality and Recombination in Genetically Differentiated Subgroups of Cryptococcus gattii

Overview of attention for article published in Eukaryotic Cell, August 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 509)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 blog

Citations

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90 Dimensions

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Clonality and Recombination in Genetically Differentiated Subgroups of Cryptococcus gattii
Published in
Eukaryotic Cell, August 2005
DOI 10.1128/ec.4.8.1403-1409.2005
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. T. Campbell, B. J. Currie, M. Krockenberger, R. Malik, W. Meyer, J. Heitman, D. Carter, Campbell LT, Currie BJ, Krockenberger M, Malik R, Meyer W, Heitman J, Carter D

Abstract

Cryptococcus gattii is a pathogenic yeast that together with Cryptococcus neoformans causes cryptococcosis in humans and animals. High numbers of viable C. gattii propagules can be obtained from certain species of Australian Eucalyptus camaldulensis trees, and an epidemiological link between Eucalyptus colonization and human exposure has been proposed. However, the highest prevalence of C. gattii cryptococcosis occurs in Papua New Guinea and in regions of Australia where the eucalypt species implicated to date are not endemic. This study investigated the population structure of three geographically distinct clinical and veterinary populations of C. gattii from Australia and Papua New Guinea. All populations that consisted of a genotype found frequently in Australia (VGI) were strongly clonal and were highly differentiated from one another. Two populations of the less common VGII genotype from Sydney and the Northern Territory had population structures inferring recombination. In addition, there was some evidence of reduced genetic differentiation between these geographically remote regions. In a companion study presented in this issue, VGII isolates were overwhelmingly more fertile than those of the VGI genotype, giving biological support to the indirect assessment of sexual exchange. It appears that the VGI genotype propagates clonally on eucalypts in Australia and on an unknown substrate in Papua New Guinea, with infection initiated by an unidentified infectious propagule. VGII isolates are completing their life cycles and may be dispersed via sexually produced basidiospores, which are also likely to initiate respiratory infection.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 32%
Student > Master 7 21%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Professor 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 53%
Environmental Science 8 24%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2008.
All research outputs
#985,270
of 6,054,692 outputs
Outputs from Eukaryotic Cell
#34
of 509 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#906,070
of 5,076,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Eukaryotic Cell
#32
of 463 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,054,692 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 509 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 5,076,625 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 463 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.