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Steering cell migration by alternating blebs and actin-rich protrusions

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
reddit
2 Redditors
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

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138 Mendeley
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Title
Steering cell migration by alternating blebs and actin-rich protrusions
Published in
BMC Biology, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12915-016-0294-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alba Diz-Muñoz, Pawel Romanczuk, Weimiao Yu, Martin Bergert, Kenzo Ivanovitch, Guillaume Salbreux, Carl-Philipp Heisenberg, Ewa K. Paluch

Abstract

High directional persistence is often assumed to enhance the efficiency of chemotactic migration. Yet, cells in vivo usually display meandering trajectories with relatively low directional persistence, and the control and function of directional persistence during cell migration in three-dimensional environments are poorly understood. Here, we use mesendoderm progenitors migrating during zebrafish gastrulation as a model system to investigate the control of directional persistence during migration in vivo. We show that progenitor cells alternate persistent run phases with tumble phases that result in cell reorientation. Runs are characterized by the formation of directed actin-rich protrusions and tumbles by enhanced blebbing. Increasing the proportion of actin-rich protrusions or blebs leads to longer or shorter run phases, respectively. Importantly, both reducing and increasing run phases result in larger spatial dispersion of the cells, indicative of reduced migration precision. A physical model quantitatively recapitulating the migratory behavior of mesendoderm progenitors indicates that the ratio of tumbling to run times, and thus the specific degree of directional persistence of migration, are critical for optimizing migration precision. Together, our experiments and model provide mechanistic insight into the control of migration directionality for cells moving in three-dimensional environments that combine different protrusion types, whereby the proportion of blebs to actin-rich protrusions determines the directional persistence and precision of movement by regulating the ratio of tumbling to run times.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 136 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 26%
Researcher 20 14%
Student > Master 20 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 4%
Other 20 14%
Unknown 23 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 44 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 31%
Physics and Astronomy 11 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Engineering 4 3%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 25 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,678,763
of 13,505,974 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#758
of 1,186 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,055
of 264,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,505,974 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,186 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.8. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,747 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them