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The 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone improves esophageal motor function and symptoms in systemic sclerosis: a 4-week, open-label trial

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, September 2016
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Title
The 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone improves esophageal motor function and symptoms in systemic sclerosis: a 4-week, open-label trial
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13075-016-1094-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

George P. Karamanolis, Stylianos Panopoulos, Konstantinos Denaxas, Anastasios Karlaftis, Alexandra Zorbala, Dimitrios Kamberoglou, Spiros D. Ladas, Petros P. Sfikakis

Abstract

Acute administration of the oral 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone, which is commonly used as an anxiolytic drug, may improve compromised lower esophageal sphincter function. In an open-label trial we assessed the effects of buspirone on esophageal motor function and symptoms in patients with esophageal involvement associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Thirty consecutive patients with SSc and symptomatic esophageal involvement, despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors, underwent high resolution manometry and chest computed tomography for assessment of motor function and esophageal dilatation, respectively. Regurgitation, heartburn, dysphagia, and chest pain severity was subjectively scored by visual analog scales. Manometric parameters (primary endpoint) and symptom severity (secondary endpoint) were re-examined after 4-week daily administration of 20 mg buspirone. Other medications remained unchanged. Eight patients did not complete the trial because of buspirone-associated dizziness (n = 2), or nausea (n = 2), or reluctancy to undergo final manometry. In the remaining 22 patients lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure increased from 7.7 ± 3.9 to 12.2 ± 4.6 mmHg (p = 0.00002) after buspirone administration; other manometric parameters did not change. Statistical analysis revealed negative correlation between individual increases in resting LES pressure and supra-aortic esophageal diameter (r = -0.589, p = 0.017), suggesting a more beneficial effect in patients with less severely affected esophageal function. Heartburn and regurgitation scores decreased at 4 weeks compared to baseline (p = 0.001, and p = 0.022, respectively). Our findings warrant more conclusive evaluation with a double-blind controlled study; however, buspirone could potentially be given under observation for objective improvement in all patients with SSc who report reflux symptoms despite undergoing standard treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02363478 Registered: 21-02-2014.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 21%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Professor 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2016.
All research outputs
#10,308,903
of 11,622,318 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,602
of 1,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#215,963
of 258,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#29
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,622,318 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.