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La desesperación in Latino migrant day laborers and its role in alcohol and substance-related sexual risk

Overview of attention for article published in SSM - Population Health , December 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
La desesperación in Latino migrant day laborers and its role in alcohol and substance-related sexual risk
Published in
SSM - Population Health , December 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ssmph.2016.01.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kurt C. Organista, Sonya G. Arreola, Torsten B. Neilands

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to better understand the relation between psychological distress and alcohol and substance related sexual risk in Latino migrant day laborers (LMDLs). In addition to examining the roles of depression and anxiety, it was also necessary to examine the role of desesperación, a popular Latino idiom of distress frequently expressed by LMDLs in response to the thwarting of major migration related life goals such as traveling to the U.S. in search of work to support families, projects and purchases in country of origin. Given the structural vulnerability of LMDLs to under-employment and frequent unemployment, LMDLs also refer to desesperación as a prelude to problem drinking, substance use, and sexual risk taking. Hence we developed and validated a scale of desesperación for LMDLs to explore this culturally relevant construct of psychological distress in this unique population of Latinos. Based on a cross sectional survey of 344 LMDLs, this study found that the dissatisfaction subscale of desesperación predicted alcohol-related sexual risk taking, while depression predicted substance-related sexual risk taking. These findings are discussed including implications of preventing alcohol and substance related sexual risk taking in LMDLs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 26%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Lecturer 3 8%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 8 21%
Psychology 6 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 15%
Chemistry 2 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,579,705
of 12,568,493 outputs
Outputs from SSM - Population Health
#181
of 249 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,898
of 262,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SSM - Population Health
#10
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,568,493 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 249 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,304 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.