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Act local, think global: how the Malawi experience of scaling up antiretroviral treatment has informed global policy

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2016
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
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Title
Act local, think global: how the Malawi experience of scaling up antiretroviral treatment has informed global policy
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3620-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony D. Harries, Nathan Ford, Andreas Jahn, Erik J. Schouten, Edwin Libamba, Frank Chimbwandira, Dermot Maher

Abstract

The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi was based on a public health approach adapted to its resource-poor setting, with principles and practices borrowed from the successful tuberculosis control framework. From 2004 to 2015, the number of new patients started on ART increased from about 3000 to over 820,000. Despite being a small country, Malawi has made a significant contribution to the 15 million people globally on ART and has also contributed policy and service delivery innovations that have supported international guidelines and scale up in other countries. The first set of global guidelines for scaling up ART released by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2002 focused on providing clinical guidance. In Malawi, the ART guidelines adopted from the outset a more operational and programmatic approach with recommendations on health systems and services that were needed to deliver HIV treatment to affected populations. Seven years after the start of national scale-up, Malawi launched a new strategy offering all HIV-infected pregnant women lifelong ART regardless of the CD4-cell count, named Option B+. This strategy was subsequently incorporated into a WHO programmatic guide in 2012 and WHO ART guidelines in 2013, and has since then been adopted by the majority of countries worldwide. In conclusion, the Malawi experience of ART scale-up has become a blueprint for a public health response to HIV and has informed international efforts to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 28%
Student > Postgraduate 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Researcher 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 19 22%
Unknown 12 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 18%
Social Sciences 12 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 15 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2017.
All research outputs
#4,857,764
of 15,920,653 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,395
of 10,943 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,476
of 267,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#10
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,920,653 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,943 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,754 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.