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Economic burden of malaria on businesses in Ghana: a case for private sector investment in malaria control

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
132 Mendeley
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Title
Economic burden of malaria on businesses in Ghana: a case for private sector investment in malaria control
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1506-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Justice Nonvignon, Genevieve Cecilia Aryeetey, Keziah L. Malm, Samuel Agyei Agyemang, Vivian N. A. Aubyn, Nana Yaw Peprah, Constance N. Bart-Plange, Moses Aikins

Abstract

Despite the significant gains made globally in reducing the burden of malaria, the disease remains a major public health challenge, especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) including Ghana. There is a significant gap in financing malaria control globally. The private sector could become a significant source of financing malaria control. To get the private sector to appreciate the need to invest in malaria control, it is important to provide evidence of the economic burden of malaria on businesses. The objective of this study, therefore, was to estimate the economic burden on malaria on businesses in Ghana, so as to stimulate the sector's investment in malaria control. Data covering 2012-2014 were collected from 62 businesses sampled from Greater Accra, Ashanti and Western Regions of Ghana, which have the highest concentration of businesses in the country. Data on the cost of businesses' spending on treatment and prevention of malaria in staff and their dependants as well as staff absenteeism due to malaria and expenditure on other health-related activities were collected. Views of business leaders on the effect of malaria on their businesses were also compiled. The analysis was extrapolated to cover 5828 businesses across the country. The results show that businesses in Ghana lost about US$6.58 million to malaria in 2014, 90 % of which were direct costs. A total of 3913 workdays were lost due to malaria in firms in the study sample during the period 2012-2014. Businesses in the study sample spent an average of 0.5 % of the annual corporate returns on treatment of malaria in employees and their dependants, 0.3 % on malaria prevention, and 0.5 % on other health-related corporate social responsibilities. Again business leaders affirmed that malaria affects their businesses' efficiency, employee attendance and productivity and expenses. Finally, about 93 % of business leaders expressed the need private sector investment in malaria control. The economic burden of malaria on businesses in Ghana cannot be underestimated. This, together with business leaders' acknowledgement that it is important for private sector investment in malaria control, provides motivation for engagement of the private sector in financing malaria control activities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 132 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 132 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 25%
Student > Bachelor 19 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 11%
Researcher 14 11%
Student > Postgraduate 12 9%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 22 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 30 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 5%
Other 35 27%
Unknown 25 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2019.
All research outputs
#825,094
of 14,354,509 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#142
of 4,139 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,879
of 264,420 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,354,509 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,139 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,420 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them