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Projected wetland densities under climate change: habitat loss but little geographic shift in conservation strategy

Overview of attention for article published in Ecological Applications, September 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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74 Mendeley
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Title
Projected wetland densities under climate change: habitat loss but little geographic shift in conservation strategy
Published in
Ecological Applications, September 2016
DOI 10.1890/15-0750.1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helen R. Sofaer, Susan K. Skagen, Joseph J. Barsugli, Benjamin S. Rashford, Gordon C. Reese, Jennifer A. Hoeting, Andrew W. Wood, Barry R. Noon

Abstract

Climate change poses major challenges for conservation and management because it alters the area, quality, and spatial distribution of habitat for natural populations. To assess species' vulnerability to climate change and target ongoing conservation investments, researchers and managers often consider the effects of projected changes in climate and land use on future habitat availability and quality and the uncertainty associated with these projections. Here, we draw on tools from hydrology and climate science to project the impact of climate change on the density of wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA, a critical area for breeding waterfowl and other wetland-dependent species. We evaluate the potential for a trade-off in the value of conservation investments under current and future climatic conditions and consider the joint effects of climate and land use. We use an integrated set of hydrological and climatological projections that provide physically based measures of water balance under historical and projected future climatic conditions. In addition, we use historical projections derived from ten general circulation models (GCMs) as a baseline from which to assess climate change impacts, rather than historical climate data. This method isolates the impact of greenhouse gas emissions and ensures that modeling errors are incorporated into the baseline rather than attributed to climate change. Our work shows that, on average, densities of wetlands (here defined as wetland basins holding water) are projected to decline across the U.S. Prairie Pothole Region, but that GCMs differ in both the magnitude and the direction of projected impacts. However, we found little evidence for a shift in the locations expected to provide the highest wetland densities under current vs. projected climatic conditions. This result was robust to the inclusion of projected changes in land use under climate change. We suggest that targeting conservation towards wetland complexes containing both small and relatively large wetland basins, which is an ongoing conservation strategy, may also act to hedge against uncertainty in the effects of climate change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 73 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 23%
Researcher 17 23%
Student > Master 11 15%
Professor 5 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 9 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 25 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 11%
Engineering 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,390,533
of 14,145,010 outputs
Outputs from Ecological Applications
#1,634
of 2,332 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,866
of 264,170 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecological Applications
#34
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,145,010 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,332 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,170 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.