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Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
22 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
70 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
Title
Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island
Published in
Science Advances, September 2016
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1600029
Pubmed ID
Authors

E. H. Paxton, R. J. Camp, P. M. Gorresen, L. H. Crampton, D. L. Leonard, E. A. VanderWerf

Abstract

The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to climate change, given their susceptibility to introduced disease, the strong linkage of disease distribution to climatic conditions, and their current distribution. We document the rapid collapse of the native avifauna on the island of Kaua'i that corresponds to changes in climate and disease prevalence. Although multiple factors may be pressuring the community, we suggest that a tipping point has been crossed in which temperatures in forest habitats at high elevations have reached a threshold that facilitates the development of avian malaria and its vector throughout these species' ranges. Continued incursion of invasive weeds and non-native avian competitors may be facilitated by climate change and could also contribute to declines. If current rates of decline continue, we predict multiple extinctions in the coming decades. Kaua'i represents an early warning for the forest bird communities on the Maui and Hawai'i islands, as well as other species around the world that are trapped within a climatic space that is rapidly disappearing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 70 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 83 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Student > Bachelor 10 12%
Student > Master 9 11%
Other 6 7%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 12 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 36%
Environmental Science 15 18%
Engineering 6 7%
Unspecified 5 6%
Mathematics 3 4%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 12 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 280. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2018.
All research outputs
#36,923
of 12,373,386 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#271
of 2,466 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,943
of 262,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#13
of 133 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,386 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,466 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 126.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,741 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 133 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.