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Revealing the Earth’s mantle from the tallest mountains using the Jinping Neutrino Experiment

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
25 news outlets
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
Revealing the Earth’s mantle from the tallest mountains using the Jinping Neutrino Experiment
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep33034
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ondřej Šrámek, Bedřich Roskovec, Scott A. Wipperfurth, Yufei Xi, William F. McDonough

Abstract

The Earth's engine is driven by unknown proportions of primordial energy and heat produced in radioactive decay. Unfortunately, competing models of Earth's composition reveal an order of magnitude uncertainty in the amount of radiogenic power driving mantle dynamics. Recent measurements of the Earth's flux of geoneutrinos, electron antineutrinos from terrestrial natural radioactivity, reveal the amount of uranium and thorium in the Earth and set limits on the residual proportion of primordial energy. Comparison of the flux measured at large underground neutrino experiments with geologically informed predictions of geoneutrino emission from the crust provide the critical test needed to define the mantle's radiogenic power. Measurement at an oceanic location, distant from nuclear reactors and continental crust, would best reveal the mantle flux, however, no such experiment is anticipated. We predict the geoneutrino flux at the site of the Jinping Neutrino Experiment (Sichuan, China). Within 8 years, the combination of existing data and measurements from soon to come experiments, including Jinping, will exclude end-member models at the 1σ level, define the mantle's radiogenic contribution to the surface heat loss, set limits on the composition of the silicate Earth, and provide significant parameter bounds for models defining the mode of mantle convection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 8%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 23 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Professor 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 46%
Physics and Astronomy 7 27%
Unspecified 5 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Chemistry 1 4%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 197. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2018.
All research outputs
#70,372
of 13,839,074 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#954
of 69,619 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,882
of 263,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#50
of 3,542 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,839,074 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 69,619 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,852 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,542 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.