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Representation of Ecological Systems within the Protected Areas Network of the Continental United States

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
110 Mendeley
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Title
Representation of Ecological Systems within the Protected Areas Network of the Continental United States
Published in
PLoS ONE, January 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0054689
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jocelyn L. Aycrigg, Anne Davidson, Leona K. Svancara, Kevin J. Gergely, Alexa McKerrow, J. Michael Scott

Abstract

If conservation of biodiversity is the goal, then the protected areas network of the continental US may be one of our best conservation tools for safeguarding ecological systems (i.e., vegetation communities). We evaluated representation of ecological systems in the current protected areas network and found insufficient representation at three vegetation community levels within lower elevations and moderate to high productivity soils. We used national-level data for ecological systems and a protected areas database to explore alternative ways we might be able to increase representation of ecological systems within the continental US. By following one or more of these alternatives it may be possible to increase the representation of ecological systems in the protected areas network both quantitatively (from 10% up to 39%) and geographically and come closer to meeting the suggested Convention on Biological Diversity target of 17% for terrestrial areas. We used the Landscape Conservation Cooperative framework for regional analysis and found that increased conservation on some private and public lands may be important to the conservation of ecological systems in Western US, while increased public-private partnerships may be important in the conservation of ecological systems in Eastern US. We have not assessed the pros and cons of following the national or regional alternatives, but rather present them as possibilities that may be considered and evaluated as decisions are made to increase the representation of ecological systems in the protected areas network across their range of ecological, geographical, and geophysical occurrence in the continental US into the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 101 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 32 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 18%
Student > Master 18 16%
Other 12 11%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 9 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 39 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 34%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 5%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 14 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2013.
All research outputs
#3,331,710
of 12,091,208 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#45,241
of 133,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,770
of 291,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#2,029
of 6,534 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,208 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133,026 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,714 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,534 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.