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Can We Name Earth's Species Before They Go Extinct?

Overview of attention for article published in Science, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
624 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
Can We Name Earth's Species Before They Go Extinct?
Published in
Science, January 2013
DOI 10.1126/science.1230318
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark J. Costello, Robert M. May, Nigel E. Stork, Costello MJ, May RM, Stork NE, M. J. Costello, R. M. May, N. E. Stork

Abstract

Some people despair that most species will go extinct before they are discovered. However, such worries result from overestimates of how many species may exist, beliefs that the expertise to describe species is decreasing, and alarmist estimates of extinction rates. We argue that the number of species on Earth today is 5 ± 3 million, of which 1.5 million are named. New databases show that there are more taxonomists describing species than ever before, and their number is increasing faster than the rate of species description. Conservation efforts and species survival in secondary habitats are at least delaying extinctions. Extinction rates are, however, poorly quantified, ranging from 0.01 to 1% (at most 5%) per decade. We propose practical actions to improve taxonomic productivity and associated understanding and conservation of biodiversity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 94 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 624 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 22 4%
United States 21 3%
United Kingdom 12 2%
Germany 10 2%
Spain 10 2%
Italy 3 <1%
South Africa 3 <1%
France 3 <1%
Portugal 3 <1%
Other 32 5%
Unknown 505 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 155 25%
Researcher 146 23%
Student > Master 88 14%
Student > Bachelor 60 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 42 7%
Other 132 21%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 394 63%
Environmental Science 115 18%
Unspecified 40 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 27 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 2%
Other 36 6%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 254. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2017.
All research outputs
#36,113
of 11,449,911 outputs
Outputs from Science
#1,291
of 52,272 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#827
of 312,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#24
of 822 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,449,911 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 52,272 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 312,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 822 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.